CheckPoint.156-215.2010-7-29.by.Vuyane.150q

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Exam A
QUESTION 1
Frank wants to know why users on the corporate network cannot receive multicast transmissions from the Internet. An NGX Security Gateway protects the corporate network from the Internet. Which of the following is a possible cause for the connection problem?
A. NGX does not support multicast routing protocols and streaming media through the Security Gateway.
B. Frank did not install the necessary multicast license with SmartUpdate, when he upgraded to NGX.
C. The Multicast Rule is below the Stealth Rule. NGX can only pass multicast traffic, if the Multicast Rule is above the Stealth Rule.
D. Multicast restrictions are not configured properly on the corporate internal network interface properties of the Security Gateway object.
E. Anti-spoofing is enabled. NGX cannot pass multicast traffic, if anti-spoofing is enabled.
Correct Answer: D

QUESTION 2
In NGX, what happens if a Distinguished Name (DN) is NOT found in LDAP?
A. NGX takes the common-name value from the Certificate subject, and searches the LDAP account unit for a matching user id.
B. NGX searches the internal database for the username.
C. The Security Gateway uses the subject of the Certificate as the DN for the initial lookup.
D. If the first request fails or if branches do not match, NGX tries to map the identity to the user id attribute.
E. When users authenticate with valid Certificates, the Security Gateway tries to map the identities with users registered in the external LDAP user database.
Correct Answer: B

QUESTION 3
Gary is a Security Administrator in a small company. He needs to determine if the company’s Web servers are accessed for an excessive number of times from the same host. How would he configure this setting in SmartDefense?
A. Successive multiple connections
B. HTTP protocol inspection
C. Successive alerts
D. General HTTP worm catcher
E. Successive DoS attacks
Correct Answer: A

QUESTION 4
In SmartDashboard, you configure 45 MB as the required free hard-disk space to accommodate logs. What can you do to keep old log files, when free space falls below 45 MB?
A. Define a secondary SmartCenter Server as a log server, to transfer the old logs.
B. Configure a script to archive old logs to another directory, before old log files are deleted.
C. Do nothing. Old logs are deleted, until free space is restored.
D. Use the fwm logexport command to export the old log files to other location.
E. Do nothing. The SmartCenter Server archives old logs to another directory.
Correct Answer: B

QUESTION 5
Brianna has three servers located in a DMZ, using private IP addresses. She wants internal users from
10.10.10.x
to access the DMZ servers by public IP addresses. Internal_net

10.10.10.x
is configured for Hide NAT behind the Security Gateway’s external interface.

What is the best configuration for 10.10.10.x users to access the DMZ servers, using the DMZ servers’ public IP addresses?

A. Configure automatic Static NAT rules for the DMZ servers.
B. Configure manual Static NAT rules to translate the DMZ servers, when connecting to the Internet.
C. Configure manual static NAT rules to translate the DMZ servers, when the source is the internal network
10.10.10.x.
D. Configure Hide NAT for the DMZ network behind the DMZ interface of the Security Gateway, when connecting to internal network 10.10.10.x.
E. Configure Hide NAT for 10.10.10.x behind DMZ’s interface, when trying to access DMZ servers.
Correct Answer: C

QUESTION 6
You are setting up a Virtual Private Network, and must select an encryption scheme. Network performance is a critical issue – even more so than the security of the packet. Which encryption scheme would you select?
A. In-place encryption
B. Tunneling mode encryption
C. Either one will work without compromising performance
Correct Answer: A

QUESTION 7
Larry is the Security Administrator for a software-development company. To isolate the corporate network from the developers’ network, Larry installs an internal Security Gateway.
Larry wants to optimize the performance of this Gateway. Which of the following actions is most likely to improve the Gateway’s performance?
A. Remove unused Security Policies from Policy Packages.
B. Clear all Global Properties check boxes, and use explicit rules.
C. Use groups within groups in the manual NAT Rule Base.
D. Put the least-used rules at the top of the Rule Base.
E. Use domain objects in rules, where possible.
Correct Answer: A
QUESTION 8
If a digital signature is used to achieve both data-integrity checking and verification of sender, digital signatures are only used when implementing:
A. A symmetric encryption algorithm.
B. CBL-DES.
C. ESP.
D. An asymmetric encryption algorithm.
E. Triple DES.
Correct Answer: D

QUESTION 9
Ellen is performing penetration tests against SmartDefense for her Web server farm. She needs to verify that the Web servers are secure against traffic hijacks. She has selected the “Products > Web Server” box on each of the node objects. What other settings would be appropriate? Ellen:
A. needs to configure TCP defenses such as “Small PMTU” size.
B. should enable all settings in Web Intelligence.
C. needs to create resource objects for the web farm servers and configure rules for the web farm.
D. must activate the Cross-Site Scripting property.
E. should also enable the Web intelligence > SQL injection setting.
Correct Answer: D

QUESTION 10
Which of the following commands is used to restore NGX configuration information?
A. cpconfig
B. cpinfo -i
C. restore
D. fwm dbimport
E. upgrade_import
Correct Answer: E

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Cisco.642-584.2013-01-31.by.Arma.50q

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Exam A
QUESTION 1
Which two questions should you ask when assessing an organization’s security needs? (Choose two.)
A. Are you exploring new cloud business models?
B. Are you enforcing the same security policies consistently across your organization?
C. Are you using the latest hardware and software versions for your security devices?
D. Are you using single-vendor security equipment?
E. What are the operating hours of your security response team?

Correct Answer: AB Section: (none) Explanation
Explanation/Reference:
Explanation:

QUESTION 2
Which four features are provided by the Cisco AnyConnect client for Windows? (Choose four.)
A. SSL VPN
B. IPsec VPN
C. Host intrusion prevention system
D. Presence
E. MACsec encryption
F. Antivirus
G. Personal firewall
H. Cisco ScanSafe integration

Correct Answer: ABEH Section: (none) Explanation
Explanation/Reference:
Explanation:

QUESTION 3
Which two statements about CVD and SBA are true? (Choose two.)
A. SBA guides are available for enterprise deployments only.
B. CVD includes everything from rough designs to tested versions of software code.
C. Gold partners have access to a demo lab for each validated design.
D. CVD is technology-oriented, while SBA is market- and solution-oriented.

Correct Answer: BD Section: (none) Explanation
Explanation/Reference:
Explanation:

QUESTION 4
Which two statements about standard clients for wireless, wired, and VPN are true? (Choose two.)
A. Most clients have wireless and VPN clients integrated already.
B. Services of integrated clients differ per OS and include wireless clients, IPsec clients, and L2TP and PPTP clients.
C. Standard clients are easy to manage by a central IT organization.
D. Android mobile devices include the Cisco IPsec client.
E. Apple iOS clients do not include the Cisco IPsec client.

Correct Answer: AB Section: (none) Explanation
Explanation/Reference:
Explanation:

QUESTION 5
Which two statements about the capabilities of the Cisco AnyConnect 3.0 Secure Mobility Client for Windows are true? (Choose two.)
A. It supports always-on connectivity by automatically establishing a VPN connection as needed. If multiple VPN gateways exist, load sharing occurs in a Round-robin fashion.
B. It supports session persistence after hibernation or standby.
C. Trusted Network Detection allows the connection to be established without any user intervention (authentication), if the client is located inside the office.
D. It is exclusively configured by central policies; no local configuration is possible.
E. The order of policy enforcement is as follows: dynamic access policy, user attributes, tunnel group, group policy attributes.

Correct Answer: BC Section: (none) Explanation
Explanation/Reference:
Explanation:
QUESTION 6
Which statement best describes Cisco ISE?
A. Cisco ISE consolidates user AAA, Security Group Access features, and ScanSafe functionality into one product.
B. Cisco ISE consolidates user authentication with NAC components into one solution.
C. Cisco ISE provides AAA features, guest provisioning, and device profiling features in the base feature set; link encryption policies, host posture, and security group access require the advanced feature set.
D. Cisco ISE combines the capabilities of Cisco Secure ACS and Cisco Virtual Security Gateway into one product.

Correct Answer: B Section: (none) Explanation
Explanation/Reference:
Explanation:
QUESTION 7
Which two components are 802.1X components? (Choose two.)
A. Client
B. Authenticator
C. Authentication server
D. User?
E. Accounting server
Correct Answer: BC Section: (none) Explanation

Explanation/Reference:
Explanation:
QUESTION 8
Which statement about 802.1X is true?
A. MAB allows clients that do not support 802.1X to be authenticated based on their MAC address.
B. MDA does not allow multiple clients to be independently authenticated at the same switch port if they are in different domains, or VLANs.
C. EAP-TLS requires a client certificate.
D. PEAP-MSCHAPv2 requires a client certificate.

Correct Answer: A Section: (none) Explanation
Explanation/Reference:
Explanation:
QUESTION 9
Which statement about SGACL is true?
A. SGACL does not allow customers to keep the existing local design at the access layer.
B. SGACL allows customers to apply or change policies that meet today’s business requirements.
C. With SGACL, traffic that is received by a device gets tagged at egress and is then potentially filtered at ingress, based on the previously assigned tag.
D. With SGACL, all network devices belonging to the same group automatically enforce the same policy.

Correct Answer: A Section: (none) Explanation
Explanation/Reference:
Explanation:
QUESTION 10
Which statement about MACsec is true?
A. MACsec provides Layer 2 hop-by-hop encryption, based on the 802.1AE standard.
B. Cisco AnyConnect Release 3.0 supports both roles: supplicant and authenticator?
C. 802.1X protection includes the CMD field, which is used to carry the security group tag value.
D. MACsec does not work between any MACsec-capable supplicant and authenticator.

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Real IBM 000-130 Exam Questions

29

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30

Linux

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2. Linux Windows

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2. Linux Windows

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2.4.1. LILO Linux
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34

Linux

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2. Linux Windows

35

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, , . Windows NT Windows 2000, NT Loader. Windows 95 Windows 98 FAT16, – , LILO, DOS, Linux loadlin.exe ( , , ). Windows 95 OSR2 Windows 98 FAT32, – , loadlin.exe. HOWTO , LILO, FAT32, . Linux NT Loader, 32-, .

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2.5. 2.5.1.
, . . . . , Linux, . . /dev/hda, /dev/hdb . . , /dev/hdal, /dev/hda2 . . — . , Windows Linux . ( , ). — 8,4 ( — 1024). : , , . , (. 2.2).
2.2. Windows 95 Windows 98 Windows NT Windows 2000 Linux Red Hat 6.2 ( ) 100 200 200 700 700

2. Linux Windows

37

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9L0-409 Apple Real Exam Questions,9L0-409 APPLE Exam

9l0-409
Neil R. Wyler Technical Editor Trent Fausett Kevin Fletcher Patrick Foxhoven Mark J. Lucas Kevin Miller Kevin Peterson Brad Woodberg

Elsevier, Inc., the author(s), and any 9L0-409 person or firm involved in the writing, editing, or production (collectively “Makers”) of this book (“the Work”) do not guarantee or warrant the results to be obtained from the Work. There is no guarantee of any kind, expressed or implied, regarding the Work or its contents. The Work is sold AS IS and WITHOUT WARRANTY. You may have other legal rights, which vary from state to state. In no event will Makers be liable to you for damages, including any loss of profits, lost savings, or other incidental or consequential damages arising out from the Work or its contents. Because some states do not allow the exclusion or limitation of liability for consequential or incidental damages, the above limitation may not apply to you. You should always use reasonable care, including backup and other appropriate precautions, when working with computers, networks, data, and files. Syngress Media®, Syngress®, “Career Advancement Through Skill Enhancement®,” “Ask the Author UPDATE®,” and “Hack Proofing®,” are registered trademarks of Elsevier, Inc. “Syngress: The Definition of a Serious Security Library”TM, “Mission CriticalTM,” and “The Only Way to Stop a Hacker is to Think Like OneTM” are trademarks of Elsevier, Inc. Brands and product names mentioned in this book are trademarks or service marks of their respective companies.
KEY 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 SERIAL NUMBER HJIRTCV764 PO9873D5FG 829KM8NJH2 BPOQ48722D CVPLQ6WQ23 VBP965T5T5 HJJJ863WD3E 2987GVTWMK 629MP5SDJT IMWQ295T6T

PUBLISHED BY Syngress Publishing, Inc. Elsevier, Inc. 30 Corporate Drive Burlington, MA 01803
Juniper(r) Networks Secure Access SSL VPN Configuration Guide

Copyright © 2007 by Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved. Printed in the United States of America. Except as permitted under the Copyright Act of 1976, no part of this publication may be reproduced or distributed in any form or by any means, or stored in a database or retrieval system, without the prior written permission of the publisher, with the exception that the program listings may be entered, stored, and executed in a computer system, but they may not be reproduced for publication. Printed in the United States of America 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 ISBN 13: 978-1-59749-200-3 Publisher: Amorette Pedersen Acquisitions Editor: Andrew Williams Technical Editor: Neil Wyler Project Manager: Gary Byrne Page Layout and Art: SPI Copy Editors: Michelle Lewis and Audrey Doyle Indexer: Nara Wood Cover Designer: Michael Kavish

For information on rights, translations, and bulk sales, contact Matt Pedersen, Commercial Sales Director and Rights, at Syngress Publishing; email [email protected]

Technical Editor and Contributing Author
Neil R. Wyler ( JNCIA-SSL, JNCIS-FWV, JNCIS-M) is an information security engineer and researcher located on the Wasatch Front in Utah. He is currently doing contract work for Juniper Networks, working with the company’s Security Products Group. Neil is a staff member of the Black Hat Security Briefings and Def Con hacker conference. He has spoken at numerous security conferences and been the subject of various online, print, film, and television interviews regarding different areas of information security. He was the lead author and technical editor of Aggressive Network Self-Defense (Syngress, ISBN: 1-931836-20-5) and coauthor of Configuring Juniper Networks NetScreen & SSG Firewalls (Syngress, ISBN: 1-59749-118-7).

Contributors
Trent Fausett ( JNCIA-FWV, JNCIA-SSL) is a network engineer with Valcom (the longest standing Juniper reseller) in Salt Lake City, UT. He was previously doing contract work for Juniper Networks for the SSL VPN primary Technical Assistance Center. He did extensive work with improving the Juniper SSL VPN knowledge base and helped publish the SSL VPN resolution guides available on the Juniper support site today. He is currently finishing up a bachelor’s degree in Computer Science. Kevin Fletcher (CISSP) works for Juniper Networks in technical marketing and was formerly a product manager at Neoteris, the inventor of the first SSL VPN appliance. He has spent the last several years building and evangelizing SSL VPNs and works closely with organizations all over the world as they design and deploy their next-generation remote access control solutions. Kevin’s primary areas of expertise include HTTP, SSL/TLS, PKI, AAA, network management,Web security, and overall solution design. He has over 10 years’ network management and security experience and holds a bachelor’s degree from Purdue University in Telecommunications Networking. Patrick Foxhoven ( JNCIS-FWV, JNCIA-IDP, JNCIA-SSL, ECDP, MCP+I, CCNA) is the chief information officer of CentraComm Communications, a leading managed security service provider (MSSP) and Juniper Networks Elite J-Partner based in Findlay, OH. Patrick has over 12 years of diverse professional experience in telecommunications, managed security, and mission-critical networking fields encompassing a unique mix of multisite networking, security, hosting, wireless, and consulting strategies for solutions aimed at medium-sized through Fortune 500 accounts. Prior to joining CentraComm, Patrick served as vice president of a regional Internet service provider with five physical network points of presence in Ohio serving over 2,500 customers. He has hands-on proficiency and multiple industry certifications. Mark J. Lucas (MCSE and GIAC Certified Windows Security Administrator) is a senior system administrator at the California Institute of Technology. Mark is responsible for the design, implementation, and security of high-availability systems such as Microsoft Exchange servers,VMWare ESX hosted servers, and various licensing servers. He is also responsible for the firewalls protecting these systems. Mark has been in the IT industry for 10 years. Mark lives in Tujunga, CA, with his wife, Beth, and the furry, four-legged children, Aldo, Cali, Chuey, and Emma. Kevin Miller ( JNCIA-SSL, CCSP, CCNP, CCDP, MCSE) is a network architect with Herman Miller Inc., an international office furniture manufacturer. From his home office in Huntsville, AL, he provides network design, configuration, and support services

iii

throughout Herman Miller’s network. His specialties include Juniper’s SSL concentrators and Cisco routers, switches, firewalls, wireless and Web content services. Kevin’s background includes significant experience with both security and quality-of-service technology. Kevin Peterson (CISSP, JNCIA-SSL) is an SSL VPN specialist for the eastern region (U.S.) with Juniper Networks and has been working with the Juniper SSL VPN for over four years. Kevin’s background includes positions as a security product manager and a senior security architect at McKesson Information Solutions, a support engineer at Microsoft, and an avionic systems technician with the United States Air Force Special Operations Command in England. He has also authored multiple security white papers and presented at notable security conferences, including the RSA Security Conference, HIPAA Summit, The Institute for Applied Network Security, and the Healthcare Information Management Systems Society (HIMSS). Prior system and security certifications include MSCE, MCP+I, MCT, CNA, CCNA and GSEC. Kevin resides in Alpharetta, GA, with his family, Patricia, Siobhan, and Conor. Brad Woodberg ( JNCIS-FWV, JNCIS-M, JNCIA-IDP, JNCIA-SSL, JNCIA-UAC, Packeteer Expert, CCNP) is a security consultant at Networks Group Inc. in Brighton, MI. At Networks Group his primary focus is designing and implementing security solutions for clients ranging from small businesses to Fortune 500 companies. His main areas of expertise include network perimeter security, intrusion prevention, security analysis, and network infrastructure. Outside of work he has a great interest in proof-of-concept vulnerability analysis, open source integration/development, and computer architecture. Brad currently holds a Computer Engineering bachelor’s degree from Michigan State University and participates with local security organizations; he also mentors and gives lectures to students interested in the computer network field. He was a contributing author to Configuring Juniper Networks NetScreen & SSG Firewalls (ISBN: 1-597491187), published by Syngress Publishing.

iv

Contents
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi Chapter 1 Defining a Firewall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Why Have Different Types of Firewalls? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Physical Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Back to Basics: Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 TCP/IP Header . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Firewall Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Application Proxy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Pros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Cons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Gateway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Packet Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Stateful Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Solutions Fast Track . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Frequently Asked Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Chapter 2 Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Initial CLI Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 IVE Console Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Initial Web Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Accessing the IVE through the WebUI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Configuring Date and Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Configuring Licensing on the IVE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Network Settings in the AdminUI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Certificates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Generating a CSR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Other Certificates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Security and System Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Security Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 System Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Solutions Fast Track . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Frequently Asked Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Chapter 3 Realms, Roles, and Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Introducing Realms, Roles, and Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Configuring Realms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Selecting and 9l0-409 vce Configuring General Settings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Selecting and Configuring Authentication Policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Selecting and Configuring Role Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Optimizing User Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Admin Realms. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 Configuring Roles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 User Roles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 General Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Standard Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104

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BCP-340 CompTIA A+ Exam Objective Map

Objective 1.0 pc harDWare (40 perceNt) 1.1 ConfigureandapplyBIOSsettings. 1.2 Differentiatebetweenmotherboardcomponents,theirpurposes,andproperties. 1.3 CompareandcontrastRAMtypesandfeatures. 1.4 Installandconfigureexpansioncards. 1.5 Installandconfigurestoragedevicesanduseappropriatemedia. 1.6 DifferentiateamongvariousCPUtypesandfeaturesand BCP-340 selecttheappropriatecoolingmethod. 1.7 Compareandcontrastvariousconnectioninterfacesandexplaintheirpurpose. 1.8 Installanappropriatepowersupplybasedonagivenscenario. 1.9

Evaluateandselectappropriatecomponentsforacustomconfiguration,tomeetcustomerspecificationsorneeds. 1.10 Givenascenario,evaluatetypesandfeaturesofdisplaydevices. 1.11 Identifyconnectortypesandassociatedcables. 1.12 Installandconfigurevariousperipheraldevices. 2.0 NetWOrKiNG (27 perceNt) 2.1 Identifytypesofnetworkcablesandconnectors. 2.2 Categorizecharacteristicsofconnectorsandcabling. 2.3 ExplainpropertiesandcharacteristicsofTCP/IP. 2.4 ExplaincommonTCPandUDPports,protocols,andtheirpurpose. 2.5

Compareandcontrastwirelessnetworkingstandardsandencryptiontypes. 2.6 Install,configure,anddeployaSOHOwireless/wiredrouterusingappropriatesettings. 2.7 CompareandcontrastInternetconnectiontypesandfeatures. 2.8 Identifyvarioustypesofnetworks. 2.9 Compareandcontrastnetworkdevicesandtheirfunctionsandfeatures. 2.10 Givenascenario,useappropriatenetworkingtools. 3.0 LaptOpS (11 perceNt) 3.1 Installandconfigurelaptophardwareandcomponents. 3.2 Compareandcontrastthecomponentswithinthedisplayofalaptop. 3.3 Compareandcontrastlaptopfeatures. 4.0 priNterS (11 perceNt) 4.1

Explainthedifferencesbetweenthevariousprintertypesandsummarizetheassociatedimaging process. 4.2 Givenascenario,install,andconfigureprinters. 4.3 Givenascenario,performprintermaintenance. 5.0 OperatiONaL prOceDUreS (11 perceNt) 5.1 Givenascenario,useappropriatesafetyprocedures. 5.2 Explainenvironmentalimpactsandthepurposeofenvironmentalcontrols. 5.3 Givenascenario,demonstratepropercommunicationandprofessionalism. 5.4

Explainthefundamentalsofdealingwithprohibitedcontent/activity. chapter 2 1,2,3 3 5,6 4 3 4,5,6,9,19 1 10 6 4,5,6,19 5,6,7 19 19 20,21,24 20,21 23 22,23 9,18 18,19 18,22 19,24 8 8 8 7 7 7 1,6,19 1,10 10 10

ExamObjectives Theexamobjectiveslistedherearecurrentasofthisbook`spublicationdate.Examobjectives aresubjecttochangeatanytimewithoutpriornoticeandatCompTIA’ssolediscretion.PleasevisittheCompTIA Certificationswebpageforthemostcurrentlistingofexamobjectives:http://certification.comptia.org/getCertified /certifications.aspx.

CompTIA A+ Exam 220-802 Objective Map
Objective 1.0 OperatiNG SYSteMS (33 perceNt) 1.1 CompareandcontrastthefeaturesandrequirementsofvariousMicrosoftOperatingSystems. 1.2 Givenascenario,install,andconfiguretheoperatingsystemusingthemostappropriatemethod. 1.3 Givenascenario,useappropriatecommandlinetools. 1.4

Givenascenario,useappropriateoperatingsystemfeaturesandtools. 1.5 Givenascenario,useControlPanelutilities(theitemsareorganizedby”classicview/largeicons”in Windows). 1.6 SetupandconfigureWindowsnetworkingonaclient/desktop. 1.7 Performpreventivemaintenanceproceduresusingappropriatetools. 1.8 ExplainthedifferencesamongbasicOSsecuritysettings. 1.9
Explainthebasicsofclient-sidevirtualization. 2.0 SecUritY (22 perceNt) 2.1 Applyandusecommonpreventionmethods. 2.2

Compareandcontrastcommonsecuritythreats. 2.3 Implementsecuritybestpracticestosecureaworkstation. 2.4 Givenascenario,usetheappropriatedatadestruction/disposalmethod. 2.5 Givenascenario,secureaSOHOwirelessnetwork. 2.6 Givenascenario,secureaSOHOwirednetwork. 3.0 MObiLe DeviceS (9 perceNt) 3.1 Explainthebasicfeaturesofmobileoperatingsystems. 3.2

Establishbasicnetworkconnectivityandconfigureemail. 3.3 Compareandcontrastmethodsforsecuringmobiledevices. 3.4

Compareandcontrasthardwaredifferencesinregardstotabletsandlaptops. 3.5 Executeandconfiguremobiledevicesynchronization. 4.0 trOUbLeShOOtiNG (36 perceNt) 4.1 Givenascenario,explainthetroubleshootingtheory. 4.2 Givenascenario,troubleshootcommonproblemsrelatedtomotherboards,RAM,CPUandpower withappropriatetools. 4.3 Givenascenario,
troubleshootharddrivesandRAIDarrayswithappropriatetools. 4.4 Givenascenario,troubleshootcommonvideoanddisplayissues. 4.5

Givenascenario,troubleshootwiredandwirelessnetworkswithappropriatetools. 4.6 Givenascenario,troubleshootoperatingsystemproblemswithappropriatetools. 4.7 Givenascenario,
troubleshootcommonsecurityissueswithappropriatetoolsandbestpractices. 4.8 Givenascenario,troubleshoot,andrepaircommonlaptopissueswhileadheringtotheappropriate procedures. 4.9 Givenascenario,
troubleshootprinterswithappropriatetools. chapter 12 11,12,15,16,18 14,16,17,24 7,12,13,14,15, 16,17,22,25 6,8,13,15, 22,25 18,19,21,22,24 15,16,17,26 25 10 22,25,26 26 25,26 25 23 24 9 9 9 9 9 10 1,2,3,24 4,14,16,17 6 19,23,24 12,15,17,26 26 8 7

ExamObjectives Theexamobjectiveslistedherearecurrentasofthisbook`spublicationdate.Examobjectives aresubjecttochangeatanytimewithoutpriornoticeandat bcp-340 exam CompTIA’ssolediscretion.PleasevisittheCompTIA

Certificationswebpageforthemostcurrentlistingofexamobjectives.

CompTIA A+ (Exam 220-801 and Exam 220-802)
Training Kit

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CCNP Security SECURE 642-637 Official Cert Guide Sean Wilkins Franklin H. Smith III

Cisco Press
800 East 96th Street Indianapolis, IN 46240
CCNP Security SECURE 642-637 Official Cert Guide

CCNP Security SECURE 642-637
Official Cert Guide

Sean Wilkins, Franklin H. Smith III
Copyright. 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc.
Published by:
Cisco Press
800 East 96th Street
Indianapolis, IN 46240 USA

All rights reserved. No part of this book may  642-637 be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without written permission from the publisher, except for the inclusion of brief quotations in a review.
Printed in the United States of America
First Printing June 2011
The Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data is on file.
ISBN-13: 978-1-58714-280-2
ISBN-10: 1-58714-280-5
Warning and Disclaimer
This book is designed to provide information for the Cisco CCNP Security 642-637 SECURE exam. Every effort has been made to make this book as complete  and as accurate as possible, but no warranty or fitness is implied.
The information is provided on an ※as is§ basis. The authors, Cisco Press, and Cisco Systems, Inc. shall have neither liability nor responsibility to any person or entity with respect to any loss or damages arising from the information contained in this book or from the use of the discs or programs that may accompany it.
The opinions expressed in this book belong to the author and are not necessarily those of Cisco Systems, Inc.

Trademark Acknowledgments
.ly capitalized. Cisco Press or Cisco Systems, Inc., cannot attest to the accuracy of this information. Use of a term in this book should not be regarded as affecting the validity of any trademark or service mark.

Corporate and Government Sales
..ness, training goals, marketing focus, and  branding interests. For more information, please contact: U.S. Corporate and Government Sales 1-800-382-3419 [email protected]
For sales outside the United States, please contact: International Sales [email protected]

Feedback Information
At Cisco Press, our goal is to create in-depth technical books of the highest quality and value. Each book is crafted with care and precision, undergoing rigorous development that involves the unique expertise of members from the professional technical community.
Readers* feedback is a natural continuation of this process. If you have any comments regarding how we could improve the quality of this book, or otherwise alter it to better suit your needs, you can contact us through email at [email protected] Please make sure to  include the book title and ISBN in your message.
We greatly appreciate your assistance.
Publisher: Paul Boger Cisco Press Program Manager: Anand Sundaram Associate Publisher: Dave Dusthimer Technical Editors: Sean Connelly and Robert Woods Executive Editor: Brett Bartow Copy Editor: John Edwards Managing Editor: Sandra Schroeder Editorial Assistant: Vanessa Evans Senior Development Editor: Christopher Cleveland Proofreader: Sheri Cain Project Editor: Mandie Frank Composition: Mark Shirar Designer: Gary Adair Indexer: Tim Wright Cisco Representative: Erik Ullanderson
About the Authors
Sean Wilkins is an accomplished networking consultant for SR-W Consulting (www.sr-wconsulting.com) and has been in the field of IT since the mid 1990s working with companies like Cisco, Lucent, Verizon, and AT&T, as well as several other private companies. Sean currently holds certifications with Cisco (CCNP/CCDP), Microsoft (MCSE), and CompTIA (A+ and Network+). He also has a Master of Science degree in information technology with a focus in network architecture and design, a Master of Science in organizational management, a Master*s Certificate in network security, a Bachelor of Science degree in computer networking, and an Associate of Applied Science degree in computer information systems. In addition to working as a consultant, Sean spends a lot of his time as a technical writer and editor for various companies.
Franklin H. Smith III (Trey) is a senior network security architect with more than 15 years of experience in designing, deploying, and securing large enterprise and service provider networks. His background includes architect-level delivery for many enterprise, data center, and SMB networks. He holds a Bachelor of Business Administration degree in management information systems. Trey*s certifications include CCSP, CCNP, CCDP, Microsoft (MCSE), and ISC2 (CISSP). His current focus is on strategic and tactical efforts related to Payment Card Industry (PCI) Data Security Standard (DSS) compliance for a Fortune 50 company.

About the Technical Reviewers
Sean Connelly, CCIE #17085 (R/S & Security), is a senior network design engineer for TASC, based in Washington, D.C. He has worked for two federal agencies over the last decade. Recent projects have included architecting a global 802.1X solution and the design and implementation of a large data center, along with active involvement in other federal cyber security initiatives. Before joining TASC, Sean was director of IT Services at ADCom, which included the design of many global WAN solutions. Aside from the two CCIEs, Sean holds a CISSP and a bachelor*s degree in business administration, with a total of 14 years of IT experience.
Robert Woods is a seasoned information assurance professional with 21 years of experi-ence in information and network security, compliance, and leadership. Recently most of his efforts have focused on securing enterprise networks for financial services organiza-tions to satisfy regulatory and industry requirements. Specific areas of focus have includ-ed strategic and tactical efforts for the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standards (PCI DSS). Robert worked as a qualified security assessor (QSA) in a strategic role at the world*s largest retailer and as a senior-level technical advisor at the largest automobile insurer in the United States. Professional certifications include CISSP, MCSE, and GSEC Gold. Robert holds a bachelor*s degree in electronic systems technology (EST) from Southern Illinois University and a Master of Science degree in information assurance (MSIA) from Norwich University.

Dedications
I dedicate this book to my girls (Stacy, Anij, and Saliah), one of which was born during the development of this book. Without all of you, none of this would be possible.
〞Sean Wilkins
To my wife and daughters (Jackie, Olivia, and Victoria): It is from you that I draw my strength, for you that I have the ambition to try to ※do better,§ and to you that I dedicate this book. Thank you for the support and understanding throughout this project.
〞Franklin H. Smith III

Acknowledgments
We want to take this opportunity to thank all the people who took our words and trans-formed them into a readable, organized, and formatted text for all of you to read and learn from. Without their efforts, this book would not have been possible. Because we only work directly with  642-637 secure pdf a few of these people, there are many people we will be unable to directly thank. For these people, we take this opportunity to thank you for your work in developing this project and look forward to working with you in the future.

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9L0-066 iPhone 8 Rumors: 2017/2018 Apple Inc. Smartphone Could Pack 5.8-Inch OLED Screen

9L0-066

An “iPhone 8” could pack a display larger than the one on the iPhone 6S Plus. That’s the buzz from a new report out of Taiwan-based research company Digitimes Research that says Apple plans to launch a 5.8-inch OLED screen smartphone 9L0-066 sometime in 2017 or 2018.

Measured diagonally, that’s about a third of an inch larger than the 5.5-inch screen found on the 6S Plus, which would make it the largest display ever offered on an iPhone, rivaling even the 5.7-inch display found in Samsung’s 070-583 Galaxy Note 5. Some of Apple’s potential suppliers for the screens may be Samsung Display, LG Display and Japan Display. This screen wouldn’t use traditional LCD technology. Instead, Apple is expected to switch to OLED displays, which don’t require an additional backlight and can help it make the iPhone even thinner. It’s also experimenting with a number of display technologies in a Taiwan 070-643 research lab.

An estimated 50 million units of the OLED equipped iPhones could make it out to customers in their first year, according to Digitimes.

That said, the rumored iPhone is likely at least a couple years from launch. In the meantime, Apple customers have a lot to look forward to 070-686 in 2016. In March, Apple is expected to launch a 4-inch iPhone SE to replace its aging iPhone 5S and a fully redesigned smartphone is anticipated for sometime in the second half of 2016, likely dubbed the “iPhone 7.” Features that could make it into the smartphone include a dual-lens camera, no headphone jack, and a faster processor. However, the dual-lens design 117-202 may come only with Apple’s iPhone 7 Plus.

If Apple does use OLED displays in its iPhone, it would be the second device in its product lineup to use the technology — the first being the Apple Watch, which went on sale in April 2015.

This Apple Inc. iPhone 7 Rumor Points to Disappointment

9L0-066

Last year, Apple purchase Israeli camera tech co LinX Imaging, and using their imaging algorithms and technology, the iPhone 7 Pro could potentially come with a multi-sensor, highly light-sensitive camera (great for the low light shots) that lies completely 117-304 flush with the body of the phone.

The iPhone Pro may be a bit different, as it is expected to cater specifically to the more outdoor-oriented Apple customers. However, the iPhone SE should be available in silver, “Space Gray”, gold and “Rose Gold” – just like 140-420 Apple’s current flagship.

How likely is it? It is said to look similar to an iPhone 5s, but with slightly curved cover glass and some upgraded internal specs, including an A9 processor, Touch 156-315.13 ID, Apple Pay support, 12-megapixel rear camera and a metal casing.

iPhone 5se/SE case with iPhone 6-like design including power button on side. As for rumours about finishes?

As far as the iPhone 7 is concerned, the most prominent rumor that we are all speculating on is the lack of the headphone jack on the device. 9to5mac is a very credible source, but it’s pretty surprising to see just how fast Apple is 1Y0-300 moving with the iPhone 5se.

The saga behind the San Bernadino iPhone 5c is about to heat up again, as Apple and the U.S. Department of Justice begin their court battle on March 22. However, it’s unlikely that the new product will drive much meaningful growth for the 1Y0-A16 company, given the diminishing importance of the iPad product line on Apple’s financials, the slowing tablet market and cannibalization from Apple’s large screen iPhones.

According to Geek Snack, Apple will release three 9l0-066 pdf new smartphones later this year, with those being the iPhone 7, the iPhone 7 Plus, and the iPhone Pro.

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Adobe 9a0-303 Photoshop turns 26: chart its history from version 1.0 to CC 2015

9A0-303

Adobe Photoshop, the industry-standard image editor and home of the PSD document format, started life back in the late eighties when PhD student  9a0-303 Thomas Knoll was working on his thesis – a work detailing the processing of digital images. This work evolved and in 1987 Thomas proceeded to develop an image-processing program for his Mac.

This application was created to HP2-Z27 work with greyscale images, and over a short period of time Thomas developed it further, adding new digital editing processes. It didn’t take long before his brother John Knoll was intrigued by the program, dubbed Display.

John, who was working at George Lucas’ Industrial Light & Magic, suggested to his brother that they turned Display into a more feature-rich fully-fledged image editing  NS0-101 program. From here the two worked together, combining Thomas’ engineering background with the design experience of his brother.

By 1988 the program had 070-178 changed dramatically, with a whole host of new features and some name changes, first to ImagePro, then to Photoshop. The Knolls decided to give the project another six months, complete a beta and attempt to sell it commercially with the help of the big guns in Silicon Valley.

One company decided to give Photoshop a go, but it 070-460 wasn’t Adobe. A company called BarneyScan was the first to take to the brothers’ software, deciding to include around 200 licensed copies of the program with its scanner hardware. It wasn’t long before Adobe did become aware of the potential that Photoshop offered. In September of 1988 John Knoll gave a presentation to Adobe’s internal creative team, and the rest is history.

After the brothers struck a deal  1D0-610 with Adobe their product saw an additional ten months of development time.

Finally, in February of 1990, version 1.0 of Photoshop was ready and launched exclusively for the Macintosh. It quickly defined what an image editing program  1Z0-474 should be – an impressive feat considering it only featured four named programmers on its splash screen, a stark contrast to today.

If you want to see the very first version of Photoshop in action, but with a modern twist, then check out this video of version 1.0 running on an iPhone.

The second version of Photoshop, codenamed Fast Eddy, arrived in June of 1991 bringing with it a whole host of new features, colour splash  1Z0-521 screen included.

Version 2.0 demanded double the RAM of its predecessor, requiring 4MB to run. A brief round-up of the features added in version 2.0 include the Path tool, the Pen tool. support for CMYK, and EPS rasterisation.

Just like version 1.0, the second version was also an  500-201 exclusively Mac affair. However, this all changed when 2.5 hit the market in November of 1992 – Photoshop had made its Windows debut. The other most significant feature added to 2.5 was support for 16-bit file types.

Codenamed Tiger  70-492 Mountain, 1994’s Photoshop 3.0 for both Windows and Mac saw the introduction of one of the programs most fundamental features: layers.

Layers made the work of many a photographer and designer easier, and although Photoshop was not the first image editing program to introduce layers, it most definitely made them a commonplace feature for any graphic software package worth its salt.

Despite now being over 20 years old, some users  C_HANAIMP131 just haven’t let go. Back in 2008 a cover of the New Yorker was created with Photoshop 3.0 – and not for retro-appeal, just because the illustrator loved version 3.0 so much.

Two years after 3.0 arrived, its big brother – codenamed Big Electric Cat – hit shelves. Version 4.0 introduced adjustment layers and macros  C2050-723 (known as Actions). The addition of Actions allowed for the automation of generic tasks, adding again to the time-saving appeal of the Photoshop product.

Photoshop 4.0 also saw several interface changes, bringing it more in line with other Adobe products.

During May, 1998, Adobe shipped Photoshop 5.0, known as Strange Cargo while in development. With it came such important features as the Magnetic Lasso, editable  C4040-332 type, and the History panel.

The History panel allowed the user to undo an action multiple times to reach an earlier state – handy stuff!

1999’s version 5.5 release saw the addition of Save For Web, a feature added specifically to format images for the Web, resulting in better compression

Codenamed Venus In Furs, the first  CLO-001 major release of the new millenium was version 6.0, which hit the shelves in September 2000.

Changes and new features introduced in this version include various changes to the user interface, the Liquify filter, Vector Shape support, and improvements to layer styles interface, to name a few.

Adding to the web-friendly features introduced in 5.5, version 6.0 added layer-based slicing – handy for web-layout work.

Version 7.0 of Photoshop, codenamed Liquid Sky, arrived in 2002.

It was the last major version with a 9a0-303 study guides numerical-only suffix, and also the last to run on the classic Mac OS 9. In 2003 Adobe released the Camera RAW plugin for Photoshop 7.0, adding the ability to manipulate digital data from an ever-growing range of cameras.

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